• Image: UKSC
  • Image: UKSC
  • Image: UKSC
  • Image: UKSC

UK Supreme Court

The Middlesex Guildhall, built between 1912-1914, has been converted and renovated by Feilden+Mawson, as Architects and Technical Advisors, into the home of the newly created UK Supreme Court, which also houses the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council.

The scheme included restoring the Gothic Revival facade and intricate decorative internal features, creating courtrooms, private chambers for justices and advocates, a grand library, offices, a public café, an exhibition space and bespoke artwork and furniture throughout the building. Externally the forecourt was landscaped and benches and sculptures incorporated to redefine the context of the refurbished building.

The project also included the development of innovative new iconography for the UKSC, and the etching of significant pieces of text into various new glazed surfaces as part of the art strategy. The resulting converted building achieved a modern highly specified interior to meet all the Supreme Court needs within an historic setting.

The secure design was composed of bollards and a bespoke stone seating area in front of the building, which features engravings by letter-sculptor Richard Kindersley. In the entrance hall an artistically engraved security screen ensures an aesthetic solution to the security lane which features the most cutting edge scanning equipment available. These integrated counterterrorism measures won the CPNI Security in the Public Realm Award.

The project received Planning and Listed Building consent in 2006, with construction starting in 2007. It was opened by HM the Queen in October 2009.